Frequently Asked Questions

Brexit and Citizens’ Rights

I’m an EU citizen living and working in the UK – do I have right of residence post-Brexit?

The agreement between the UK and the EU allows you to continue to stay in the UK provided you continue to work (or have sufficient financial resources). You will keep your residence under the conditions of EU free movement law as if it still applied, although you will need to make an application to the UK authorities for status.

For more information, see this memo on rights of EU27 and UK citizens post-Brexit.

I’m a British citizen living and working in the EU – how does Brexit affect me?

If you have lived in an EU Member State for at least five years, you have already obtained a right of permanent residence that is no longer subject to any conditions, and this right will be preserved.

Please see this memo on rights of EU27 and UK citizens post-Brexit for more information.

I’m a UK citizen and my partner is from the EU – how does Brexit affect us?

The deal between the UK and the EU protects the rights of family members and registered partners of those who are lawfully resident in the UK. The specifics will depend on your exact case, and more information on common scenarios can be found in the following document.

I am retired and now live in an EU Member State – what happens to my state pension?

You will be entitled to continue to receive your pension and other relevant social security benefits under the same conditions as today. More information on pensions and social security benefits can be found in the following document.


Travel


I’m thinking about travelling around Europe – what documents should I take with me?

Under EU rules, all travellers (including infants) need a valid ID card or passport to travel.

You can find advice on travel documents here, national contact points for European countries here, and the UK Government’s advice on foreign travel here.

If you lose your passport, have it stolen or realise it has expired during your travels, you should contact your country’s consulate or embassy as soon as possible.

I’ve experienced a delay or cancellation while travelling – what are my rights?

As an air, rail, ship or bus passenger, you have certain rights when travelling in the EU. You can find out more about these rights at the following pages:

I have reduced mobility – am I entitled to any assistance while travelling in Europe?

Yes, you have a number of rights to access assistance free of charge while travelling within the EU. You can find out more about these rights here – you may also be eligible to access an EU disability parking card, which should be recognised in all EU countries

 

Education


I am moving from the UK to another EU country – what should I do about my children’s schooling?

As EU citizens, your children are entitled to attend school in any EU country under the same conditions as nationals of that country. Note that the school system in your new home country may be very different, and you should contact the relevant authorities in this country as soon as possible to ensure a smooth transition.

You can find out more about starting school in another EU country here.

I am planning to study at a university in another EU country – what should I know?

As an EU citizen, you are entitled to study at any EU university under the same conditions as nationals. However, conditions of entry vary significantly between individual countries and universities.

Find out more about attending university in another EU country here. If you plan to work to support yourself during your studies, you should also be aware of the rules around working abroad. You may also be able to complete part of your studies abroad through the Erasmus+ programme.