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Array of speakers to put brochs in the spotlight during year of heritage

Caithness Broch Project and Orkney Archaeology Society are readying a fantastic series of lectures and discussions on one of the hottest topics in Scottish archaeology - brochs.

Tomorrow, eight guest speakers will be participating in one of the highlights of Caithness Broch Project's Year of History Heritage and Archaeology 2017 events.

The events have included the creation of a Lego broch, and the Caithness Broch Exhibition, a series of archaeological investigations at two broch sites in Caithness.

Among the line-up is Li Sou from Bradford University, who will be discussing her work at the stunning Mousa Broch in Shetland.

Using laser scanning, her project will produce detailed, accurate 3D models of the broch's interior, exterior and surrounding landscape, in the first comprehensive survey of the broch in modern times.

Also joining on the day is Alexandra Sanmark, a reader in medieval archaeology at the Institute of Northern Studies, University of the Highlands and Islands.

Alexandra will be discussing brochs as Viking "Thing" sites - the equivalent of a Norse Parliament.

As part of the Caithness Broch Project festival, a broch lose to Thurso may have been identified as one such site.

Michael Stratigos, from Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, will touch on this subject further, but also bring crannogs into the equation as he discussed promontory or islet brochs.

Several other notable broch projects will also be discussed throughout the course of the day,

Martin Carruthers, lecturer at UHI, will be discussing The Cairns project in Orkney, which has turned up fascinating finds such as a human jawbone deposited in a whalebone bowl; and Dave McBain will also talk about the work done by the Clachtoll Broch Project in Assynt, one of the most significant excavations of a broch in modern times.

Samantha Dennis, of the Old Scatness Project, is also travelling from Shetland, bringing with her a number of artefacts recovered from the Iron Age site on the island.

Tickets are priced at £15 and available from Caithness Horizons.

 

 

​Source - John O'Groat Journal